Seeking Dignity-Based Justice: An Interview With Bruce Western

…when we think about what really safe communities look like, they’re not safe because they’re very heavily policed, and the courts are really throwing the book at people who get into trouble and come into serious conflict with the law and hurt other people. Communities are made safe because of a whole web of social relationships that are in the family, at the workplace, in community organizations, and faith organizations. Community life on the street has, what Jane Jacobs described, as “eyes on the streets.” Community residents know their fellow denizens, and all of this creates webs of mutual obligation and informal social control. It regularizes behavior. It provides guardianship, particularly...
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Confronting Officer Suicide

September was Suicide Prevention Awareness Month, a designated time to acknowledge that this tragedy claims the lives of tens of thousands, including police officers. But we need to be aware of it year round. Officers face challenges unlike those in most occupations. They don’t often get the support they need to cope with emotional problems or trauma, which they may experience any day on the job. Untreated, the stress they experience can trigger serious mental, physical and performance-related consequences, including hopelessness, a prime indicator of suicide. Click here to continue reading this blog post by the Office of Justice Programs.

California governor signs criminal justice reforms

California Gov. Jerry Brown (D) on Sunday signed a series of bills aimed at overhauling the state’s juvenile justice system, reforms that advocates say will further their efforts to rehabilitate minors who commit crimes early in life. A wave of legislation has swept through legislatures, including in deep-red states like Oklahoma, Mississippi and Texas, that were once firmly committed to a tough-on-crime, incarceration-first approach to public safety.   Click here to continue reading this article by Reid Wilson for The Hill.

Mindfulness in Law: A Path to Well-Being and Balance for Lawyers and Law Students

The National Task Force on Lawyer Well-Being has raised strong concerns about the poor state of the mental health and well-being of lawyers and law students across the country. The co-chairs of the Task Force concluded that recent studies’ findings of professional ill health and lack of well-being were incompatible with a sustainable legal profession and raised troubling implications for many lawyers’ basic competence. This Article takes an in-depth look at the relevance of mindfulness for the legal profession and legal education and offers mindfulness as one way to begin to respond effectively to the Task Force’s concerns. Click here to read the article by Charity Scott in the Arizona...
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Mindfulness in public policy event to take place in Galway City

Speaking about the forthcoming event, Professor Lokesh Joshi, Vice President for Research at NUI Galway, said: “As mental health is becoming more of a priority issue for governments and policy makers, this conference will share experiences of mindfulness programmes nationally and internationally with a view to developing best practice and informing policy. “Through research and a range of activities on our campuses, we are exploring how mindfulness contributes to improved wellbeing in our society. Click here to continue reading this article by Micheál Ó Maoileoin for the Galway Daily.

Start Here: A Road Map to Reducing Mass Incarceration

Out now from The New Press, Start Here: A Road Map to Reducing Mass Incarceration articulates a new approach to justice reform that emphasizes the value of community engagement and human dignity. Written by Greg Berman and Julian Adler of the Center for Court Innovation, the book highlights programs that have succeeded in reducing neighborhood crime, enhancing public trust in justice, and changing the life trajectories of those caught up in the criminal justice system. Click here to learn more about the book, including where it can be purchased.

Western law students being taught how to relax

University now offering a one-of-a-kind course on mindfulness meditation to first year students. It’s an annual rite of spring on university campuses — exam stress. Yet, perhaps defying the odds, almost two dozen students at Western University’s Law school aren’t tearing their hair out. They are meditating. Click here to continue reading this article published by CBC News.

The art of mindfulness

With lawyers among the most stressed professionals in the UK and women the worst affected, tight deadlines, too much work, pressure and responsibility can take their toll. But mindfulness offers a way of coping for those dealing with such anxieties. Click here to continue reading this article by Matthew Kay for the Global Legal Post.
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